Scott Dalton

May 6, 2015 - May 31, 2015

The Bridge, El Paso, TX
2011
archival pigment print
30" x 30"

image © Scott Dalton
$3,000

Family on Bridge, El Paso, TX
2011
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Funeral Procession, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2010
archival pigment print
30" x 30"

image © Scott Dalton
$3,000

Wake, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2010
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Car Bomb, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2010
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Border River - Sunday Afternoon, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2010
archival pigment print
30" x 30"

image © Scott Dalton
$3,000

The Dance, El Paso, TX
2012
archival pigment print
15" x 15"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,200

Lucha Libre Living Room, El Paso, TX
2011
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Lady in Segundo Barrio, El Paso, TX
2012
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Rocker Kid, El Paso, TX
2011
archival pigment print
30" x 30"

image © Scott Dalton
$3,000

Kids on the Street, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2012
archival pigment print
30" x 30"

image © Scott Dalton
$3,000

Macula Workers, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 2012
2012
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Cotton Candy, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2010
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Scott, El Paso, TX
2012
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Hotel, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2013
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Heroin Couple, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2012
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Willie, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico
2011
archival pigment print
20" x 20"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,800

Hands at the Border Wall, USA
2011
archival pigment print
15" x 15"

image © Scott Dalton
$1,200

Scott Dalton

Where the River Bends

Since 2010, artist Scott Dalton has been photographing along the US-Mexico border, returning multiple times each year to capture on film the fraught relationship between two major cities—Ciudad Juárez in Mexico and El Paso, Texas—that share history, traditions, and geography, but are physically and politically divided. Dalton’s resulting series, Where the River Bends, depicts daily life on both sides of the Rio Grande, emphasizing the cultural similarities and interdependence between these sister cities while simultaneously revealing the conflict and inequalities reinforced by such a border.

“With this project I am trying to engage with the border as a metaphorical launching point to address a variety of themes. Borders are divisive by intent, emphasizing differences between ethnicities, cultures, economies, and nations. The subject is rife with political and social implications for poverty, the drug-war and—perhaps most notably today— immigration. But beyond these ideas I am trying to address what the border represents to the people who actually live there. This is a multifaceted realm that tends to include contradictory perspectives. For example, the border can be a land of opportunity for poor Mexican workers looking for jobs in foreign-owned factories in Ciudad Juárez, or viewed as a lawless danger zone to be feared and fenced off by others. I am also interested in the idea of the proximity and possibility of the American Dream and what that means to people on both sides of the border.”

Scott Dalton is a freelance photographer currently living in Houston, Texas. Prior to returning to his home state of Texas, Dalton spent fourteen years in Bogotá, Colombia photographing the civil conflict and drug war there. He now photographs both editorial and corporate assignments while spending his free time working on long-term personal projects that focus on the often-fragile relationship between people and the places where they live. He is currently working on projects along the troubled US-Mexico border region as well as throughout the American South. His photography has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers worldwide.