Michelle Frankfurter

February 3, 2016 - February 28, 2016

Oaxaca, July 18, 2010
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Guatemalan migrant and child, Arriaga rail yard, Chiapas, January 16, 2014
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Hermanos en El Camino migrant shelter chapel, Ixtepec, Oaxaca, June 6, 2009
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Central American migrants wait for a northbound train by the tracks in the city of Orizaba in the Mexican state of Veracruz, July 22, 2010
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Arriaga rail yard, Chiapas, January 16, 2014
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Salvadoran migrants, Oaxaca, July 18, 2010
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Honduran migrant, Hermanos en El Camino migrant shelter, Ixtepec, Oaxaca, June 10, 2009
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Oaxaca, February 5, 2011
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Salvadoran migrant, Arriaga rail yard, July 2010
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Honduran migrant, Casa de la Misericordia migrant shelter, Arriaga, Chiapas, June 2009
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Salvadoran migrant and child, Casa de la Misericordia migrant shelter, Arriaga, Chiapas, July 14, 2010
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Honduran migrant, Casa de la Misericordia migrant shelter, Arriaga, Chiapas, June 8, 2009
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

U.S. Border Patrol apprehension of migrants, Rio Grande Valley Sector near McAllen, Texas, April 29, 2013
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Woman on the levee of the canal zone that straddles the U.S.-Mexican border, Tijuana, Baja California, 2012
inkjet print
20"x20" and 24"x24"

$800—$1,500
image © Michelle Frankfurter

Michelle Frankfurter

Destino

“I seek to capture the experience of people who struggle to control their own destiny when confronted by extreme circumstances.” – Michelle Frankfurter, Destino

Destino renders in striking black-and-white the perilous journey of Central American migrants as they make their way toward the U.S.-Mexico border in hopes of finding work, and ultimately, a better life in the United States. Between 2012 and 2014, the artist joined some of these travelers as they moved across the land on the tops of trains, braving the natural elements as well as violence and exploitation at the hands of smugglers, drug cartels, and corrupt law enforcement. Now, in 2016, due to the continued demand for drugs in the United States and oppressive international trade policies, more and more young people from Central America continue to make their way north to reunite with family already living in the U.S. and to escape drug and gang-related violence, domestic abuse, and poverty at home. Through her series, Frankfurter brings this overwhelming crisis of migration into focus, revealing in the faces of those she photographs poignant stories of hardship, bravery, and perseverance.

Born in Jerusalem, Michelle Frankfurter is a documentary photographer currently living in Takoma Park, Maryland. She graduated from Syracuse University with a bachelor’s degree in English and her work has been published and exhibited worldwide. Before settling in the Washington, DC area, Frankfurter spent three years living in Nicaragua, where she worked as a stringer for the British news agency, Reuters, and with the human rights organization, Witness For Peace, documenting the effects of the contra war on civilians. In 1995, a long-term project on Haiti earned her two World Press Photo awards. Since 2000, Frankfurter has concentrated on the border region between the United States and Mexico and on themes of migration. She is a 2013 winner of the Aaron Siskind Foundation grant, a 2011 Top 50 Critical Mass winner, a finalist for the 2011 Aftermath Project and the 2012 Foto Evidence Book Award for her project Destino.