Michael Peven

January 8, 1982 - February 3, 1982

Carnival
1980-1982

image © Michael Peven

Where Wolves Were Wolves
1981
Type-C color print, scratched, safety pins

image © Michael Peven

Turkey Trot
1979
Type-C color print, straight pins

image © Michael Peven

Leopardskin Lolita
1980
Type-C color print, scratched, ink

image © Michael Peven

Spninning-Spninnach
1980
Type-C color print, scratched

image © Michael Peven

Slapping the Shore
1980
Type-C color print, scratched

image © Michael Peven

Sizzler
1981
Type-C color print, cut, scratched, sewing pins

image © Michael Peven

Pninnwind
1980
Type-C color print, scratched, straight pins

image © Michael Peven

Bible Believers
1979
Type-C color print, fishhook, thread

image © Michael Peven

Vicki's Friend Nora Juggling Oranges and Eyes
1981
Type-C color print, craft eyes

image © Michael Peven

Fish
1979
Type-C color print, straight pins

image © Michael Peven

Barbed Wire
1979
Type-C color print, straight pins

image © Michael Peven

Elvis
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Open Field
1979-1982

image © Michael Peven

Picket Fence
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Pninn Plant
1980-1982

image © Michael Peven

Skookum
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Triceratops Stampede
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Watts Towers
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Wind
1979-1982

image © Michael Peven

Cadillac Ranch
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Chuck's Neighbor's Fish
1980-1982

image © Michael Peven

Crevice
1979-1982

image © Michael Peven

Diving Helmet
1981-1982

image © Michael Peven

Michael Peven

PNINN PICTURES

I am endlessly fascinated by the reciprocal relationship that photography has with reality. The way we, as a culture, consider photographs as legitimate representations of existing visual reality. “If you can photograph it, it must be real”. Whatever “it” is. Photography is the most sophisticated medium of visual information transfer that we have invented. And yet a photograph is just a piece of paper with silver crystals, dye couplers or small droplets of ink put together in such a way as to replicate something that we generally assume is/was real.

Aaron Siskind talked about the independent nature of the photograph as an object separate from the reality of the thing depicted. These works explore that concept from a humorous perspective. By sticking pins through it, scratching words into the surface, gluing craft eyes or glitter to the image, by treating it like a piece of paper in other words, I’m trying to reinforce that idea, that fact.

My influences come pretty directly from an education that was Bauhaus oriented. I consider my approach to be a formal investigation in the sense that it is often dealing with the medium I’m working with. I think my best photographs are about what a photograph is or could be. On the other hand, In “The Age of Light”, Man Ray says that , “A certain amount of contempt for the materials employed is absolutely essential for the fullest realization of a creative idea”. I agree.

- Michael Peven