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Spotlight: 2013 Pacific NW Photography Viewing Drawers (round 4)

Happy “Drawers-Spotlight-Saturday”!

For those of you who are just stumbling upon this blog series for the first time, let me give you a brief overview: at the beginning of October, we started posting a weekly series spotlighting all of the artists represented in the 2013 Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers!

The first three weeks’ spotlights can be viewed here, here, and here.

We’ll continue to preview 10 Drawers artists every week through Thanksgiving (aka: the beginning of holiday gift shopping season). Yes, all the prints in the Drawers are for sale! Email Amanda Clem at amandaclem@blueskygallery.org or call (503) 225-0210 to inquire about prices and availability. Better yet, come to the gallery and take some time to look at the prints in person.

Blue Sky established the Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers program in 2007 to feature a juried, public archive of original prints by contemporary photographers based in the region. Our Drawers program has quickly become a favorite aspect of Blue Sky’s ongoing programming, available to approximately 25,000 visitors annually. For 2012—to coincide with the newly inaugurated Portland Photo Month (every April)—Blue Sky expanded the geographic scope of the Drawers program to include photographers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia, and Alaska.

Let’s see what we’ve got this week:

Angelina Kidd, Redmond WA

Artist Statement: I strive for authenticity and emotion, but also playfulness in my photography. The use of alternative and historical processes-wet plate collodion, palladium, pinhole/Polaroid and gelatin silver prints, silhouettes, among others-is central to my photography. Not only do these processes tend to produce an antique, timeless effect; they also reflect, through their use and disuse, the passage of time within the art of photography itself. My silhouette series explores the in-between, the transition between life on earth and the afterlife. I approach this emotionally difficult subject from a childlike perspective using silhouette imagery to create narratives and fables to provide hope that there is life after life. My intention is not to convince anyone of a religious belief but rather to provide hope that death is not the end. I accomplish this through allegory and the impressions that I create with light.

From $300 – $700

~

Heidi Kirkpatrick, Portland, OR

 

Artist Statement: I use photographs to transform found objects into playful pieces of art. Fusing transparent figurative and family portraits with children’s toys and blocks, I create a playful tension between imagery and object. My work breathes new life into these found objects, yet they leave hints of the past in their lovingly worn appearances; the flecks of paint missing, and the soft corners worn down by tiny fingers and tumbling towers. These works depart from the formality of a frame as they are arranged on a table top or a shelf, often stacked or placed side by side to reveal narratives of family snapshots, or the complexities of the feminine allure. In combination, I give you a chance to visit these earlier playful times while drawing on memories, contemporary issues, and visual formality.

From $135 – $1800

~

Tarrah Krajnak, Peoria AZ

 

Artist Statement: As an international adoptee born in Lima, Peru, and raised in the American Midwest within a multiracial family my work over the last 10 years has consistently explored identity and the desire to connect with ones’ personal ethnic lines. My recent project entitled STRAYS is the culmination of this work as I return to Lima, Peru, after 32 years, intent on documenting the Stella Maris orphanage where I was born and the now elderly nuns who still live and work there. A year later, my documentary project has transformed into a quiet metaphorical reflection on the meaning of motherhood, family, death, and home. The photographs themselves provide no easy answers as they oscillate between the world of the centenarian nuns, their archives- mostly old pictures of orphans awaiting adoption, and one hot Lima summer as I walked the streets- a tourist in my birth city.

Please inquire for pricing.

~

Bonnie Landis, Anchorage AK

 

Artist Statement:  “Abandoned in Whittier Series Photographs of the Buckner Building, Whittier Alaska” – These photographs imply that beauty exists in the decay of this massive fortress, damaged during the 1964 earthquake and abandoned by the military after WWII. As one writer said, it ‘looks like the world’s biggest haunted house.’ Abandoned in Whittier is a series of photographs of the Buckner building in Whittier, Alaska. The town of Whittier was created by the military, and chosen for its hidden location on Passage Canal, on the eastern side of steep mountains and glaciers. It would serve as a strategic fuel port for B-52 bombers during the Cold War. The Hodge and Buckner buildings housed the officers and troops that handled the Alaska operations. Once the largest building in Alaska, and called ‘a city under one roof,’ it was abandoned by the military in 1960, and badly damaged by the Good Friday Earthquake of 1964. The earthquake’s epicenter was 25 miles from Whittier. The quake propelled a tsunami wave through Prince William Sound and Wells Passage. The waves reached 43 feet in Passage Canal. In Whittier, 13 people died. Today the town of roughly 170 is mainly a fishing port. The Hodge building has been converted into condominiums, where the majority of the town lives. The Buckner building remains abandoned, a military modern day ruin; too expensive to demolish, and too large and damaged to repair. It sits forever unused. It is our history.

 

From $350

~

Larry Larsen, Seattle, WA

 

Artist Statement: This is a selection of photographs that are described by light, color and gesture. It is a record of the scenes that I have experienced. This is how the world looks when one pauses long enough to “see”. Sometimes I step out of my house, where I have lived for 30 years, into the night when you can barely make out the landscape of the garden, and in that soft summer air an immense sadness overcomes me; too soon this will not be here anymore; too soon I shall pass. Photography helps me to remember moments of light, gesture, color and expression. I want to remember the taste and smell, the joy and despair, the poetry of the multi-layered complexity of life. Every day I take my camera with me. Photography gets me into places in the world where I would not normally go and encountering people whom I would not normally speak to. Photography has expanded my experience of the world. What catches my eye? Why press the shutter? The answer has to do with the inner working of the photographer and his relationship to the external world. It is a process that will not fit into a neatly labeled box. “Life of a Photograph”, a book by Sam Abell, propelled me along this path, this life of seeing. Sam has taught me to “make” a photograph, to look for the complexity of visual and psychological layers from corner to corner of the viewfinder. He has taught me to look for poetry in a scene and to look for beauty in the commonplace. I am trying to see the shape of that phenomenon. I am looking us different and the same. At the small spaces, faces and gestures that make.

From $250

~

Frank Lavelle, Portland, OR

 

Artist Statement: “Portrait of Faith” is a testament to the Easter Holy Week processions of Marsala and Trapani, Sicily. Being a “Recovering Catholic,” I’ve always been fascinated and mystified by (and a bit envious of) the intensity of faith exhibited in the Old World Latin Cultures. In the time-honored documentary tradition, my goal in making these images was to witness, record, and possibly experience this intensity first hand. The processions were filled with passion, death, tears, and candle wax, served up by widows dressed in black and accompanied by the funereal dirge of the brass bands, filling my senses with visions of Don Corleone, cannoli, Armani suits and Gucci shades, tiramisu, children with wings, cell phone cameras, and doves. If ten o’clock Mass at Pius X had been anything like this, I’d still be a practicing Catholic today.

From $500

~

Jim Leisy, Sherwood, OR

 

Artist Statement: Amateur Physics is an exploration of the interface between art and science. It bridges 19th and 21st photographic technologies. The photographs are made with a camera, computer software is used to create the final negative, and the image is printed using the Van Dyke Brown Process invented by Sir John Herschel in 1839. I chose to print the portfolio as Van Dykes because it gives the right feel to the theme of the portfolio. Work on the portfolio was started almost three years ago and it now consists of 22 images. The photographs tend to be inspired by a scientist or an experiment.

From $600

~

Stuart Allen Levy, Beaverton, OR

Artist Statement: These images are part of my ongoing project documenting the Portland cityscape through panoramic photography. Observing and appreciating the urban environment is a big part of my daily life. I spend a lot of time running, walking, biking and driving through the neighborhoods and thoroughfares of the city, carefully taking in its sights. Noticing the details of my surroundings is my way of focusing and being in the moment. In photographing my subjects I am attempting to depict familiar locations with new perspectives. Seeing becomes something of a treasure hunt for hidden beauty to be revealed through the photograph. These photographs were made in panoramic format, by blending multiple frames together using special software. I favor the panoramic format because it can offer both the detail of a close up and the larger context of a subject, all within the same image.

From $225

~

Fritz Liedke, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: You don’t have to suffer to be a poet; adolescence is enough suffering for anyone. ~John Ciardi. Quite Normal continues my artistic explorations of the age of adolescence. For this series, I have photographed students at school, and returned a week or two later with large prints of my portraits. Students were then given time to sit with the print, and offered complete freedom to write about their lives, based on whatever my portrait inspired in them. This freedom to express themselves often led to surprising revelations, from family and relationship troubles to fears of ostracism and death. It also revealed in some students a sharp wit and humor. And this is the crux of my experience with adolescents: my frequent surprise at the depth of their pathos and humor in the midst of an often confusing and bizarre time of life. Photographs in this series are original, unique prints, limited to an edition of 1 each.

From $700

~

Jim Lommasson, Portland, OR

 

Artist Statement: Photographs taken by U.S. military personnel during deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan; the photographs were given to me for the traveling exhibition, “Exit Wounds: Life After War – Soldiers’ Stories,” and my handmade book, “I wouldn’t Wish War on My Worst Enemy.” (A quote from a twice-deployed Marine to his mother.) Photos by: Eddie Black, Jake Meeks, Arturo Franco, Ash Woolson, Jan Critchfield, and Kassie Babib.

 

From $400

~

Thank you for taking a peek! Come by the gallery any day (Tuesday through Sunday) to look through all of the other photographs at your leisure.

Sincerely,

Amanda B. Clem,
Membership & Gallery Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight: 2013 Pacific NW Photography Viewing Drawers (round 3)

Greetings, Blue Sky fans & friends!

Earlier this month,  we started posting a weekly series spotlighting all of the artists represented in the 2013 Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers! We’ll be posting here a preview of 10 Drawers artists published every week through Thanksgiving (aka: the beginning of holiday gift shopping season). Yes, all the prints in the Drawers are for sale! Email Amanda Clem at amandaclem@blueskygallery.org or call (503) 225-0210 to inquire about prices and availability. Better yet, come to the gallery and take some time to look at the prints in person.

Blue Sky established the Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers program in 2007 to feature a juried, public archive of original prints by contemporary photographers based in the region. Our Drawers program has quickly become a favorite aspect of Blue Sky’s ongoing programming, available to approximately 25,000 visitors annually. For 2012—to coincide with the newly inaugurated Portland Photo Month (every April)—Blue Sky expanded the geographic scope of the Drawers program to include photographers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia, and Alaska.

Have a look at the previous artist spotlights HERE.

Ready? Here are this week’s 10…

Lauren Grabelle, Bigfork, MT

Artist Statement: Originally from NJ, I moved to Montana in 2010 to heal the wounds that are created by living the in the most densely populated state and being so isolated from nature. Hungry Horse On the northern edge of the 1.5 million acre roadless Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex in Montana lays the Hungry Horse Dam project. I moved from the NYC area to Montana to live next to such a wilderness. Early spring reveals the cost to the land and dream.

From $250

~

Edward Hamilton, Portland OR

 

Artist Statement: “Waiting Room” —These interior panoramas were conceived (mostly) in “waiting rooms” of various businesses, hospitals, bars, etc. in Portland, Oregon, utilizing an Apple iPhone and stitching “app”. Mostly I did this to pass the time, for my own amusement, and to take away something visually interesting from otherwise sterile, impersonal spaces. We all seem to spend a major chunk of time in such places, and I decided to document some of them, using this amazing, ubiquitous tool. The major benefits of the iPhone are that it is non-threatening (to others), simple to use (but technically sophisticated) and is always with you. The result is an altered vision of space, constructed from slices of time – similar to time-lapse photography. The software sometimes makes decisions on splicing that can’t be anticipated, making for surprising results. This is an on-going project.

From $150

~

Kate Harnedy, Deadwood, OR

Artist Statement: As a portrait photographer, I am drawn to those who live on the margins in society. My documentations lead me into many subcultures. I do not only document these experiences, but also actively participate in them. This not only gives me a deeper understanding of what I am documenting, but experience and appreciation I could not gain from short visits, or as an “outsider.”

After documenting various community situations such as urban community houses and Rainbow Gatherings, I was drawn to Oregon to explore intentional community and sustainable living the Pacific Northwest is widely known for. I started with Alpha Farm: Alpha not only means “beginning,” but this community is one of the longest sustaining communities of its kind in the country.

Up in the road from Alpha Farm in Deadwood, is LivingWell, an off-grid nature spirit sanctuary. Founders Mark and Mary Gold McNutt host apprentices, along with having workshops and events on the land. They have permaculture style gardens, and various off-grid systems. And aside from being a nature sanctuary, there is a strong focus on the spirits of the land, which Mark and Mary Gold credit as co-creators of the sanctuary and events held there. LivingWell strives to be sustainable, being off-grid and completely on solar power. Gravity fed spring water comes from the land, and buildings are heated with firewood. Events held on the land include song circles and various workshops. The biggest event at LivingWell is the yearly Earth and Sky Gathering. This event has been held for nineteen years, and features a fire walk along with other workshops and rituals.

Getting to participate in these gatherings myself, I gained an appreciation not only for the power of the rituals, but the strong sense of community created by the group. LivingWell, and its affiliated non-profit Aerious, have a community of friends, neighbors and past apprentices that continue to contribute to the sanctuary.

From $200

~

Stewart Harvey, Portland OR

Artist Statement: Ephemeral Views “It’s as though there’s a wonderful secret in a certain place and I can capture it. Only I can do it at this moment, only this moment and only me…” Walker Evans. This often quoted line from Walker Evans has for better or worse guided my work for over thirty years. Like Evans, I’ve always considered myself a documentary photographer, and documentary photographers spend a lot of frames in their quest for one that illustrates the “truth” about the subject at hand. Timing is everything to the documentarian. The still camera’s singular advantage is its ability to record a significant intersection of time and place. What matters most to the success of the image is the moment the shutter is released. What matters most historically is the relevance of that moment.

I approach the culturally modified landscape in much the same way. I do think of it as photographing the land (which implies place), but also as trying to capture a revealing moment about that particular place. Composition and angle of view are important to me as a classically trained photographer, but those are learned techniques. Being in the right place and knowing when to trip the shutter is pure instinct and can’t be taught. Because of this I’m usually attracted to those situations that challenge my intuitive senses: when the weather is volatile, the lighting elusive, or the mystery hidden behind a banal façade. It’s a pure pleasure to realize that at most other times this scene would hardly be worth the effort for it’s rarely the place itself that excites; rather it’s the fragile promise of timing and opportunity coming together for a brief moment to give up its extraordinary secret.

From $300

~

Zane Healy, Aloha, OR

Artist Statement: For nearly as long as I can remember I have been fascinated by the remnants of the Coastal Defense Forts that once guarded our nations coasts. I can remember visiting Fort Stevens and the other Forts at the mouth of the Columbia River and those in the Puget Sound with my parents as a child. These were the places that I wanted to go to and explore when we were on our vacations. Now many years later I take my own children to visit the fortifications. Our favorite one is Fort Stevens, it is the closest, and it is the largest of the ones that once guarded the entrance to the Columbia. Parts of the Batteries that I loved to play on as a child, my children will never be able to play on, as many areas are no longer safe to be in. Even in the last few years, there have been several areas that were accessible that are now blocked off. These factors have been the major impetus behind this project.

From $250

~

Carol Isaak, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: “Layers” is the first word that comes to mind when people look at my work. And truly, that is exactly what I am after. Love of Layers, the name of this portfolio, represents an inquiry into how compression occurs in the translation from three to two dimensions on a printed page. Like the early cubist painters, I choose to close the distance between what is in deeper space and what is on the surface of the printed image by anchoring the images to the edges of the paper forcing them to remain on the surface. Occasionally by piercing that surface, I give the viewer a peek into deeper space.

From $250-$350

~

Ryota KajitaFairbanks, AK

Artist Statement: When the autumn goes and the winter comes on Fairbanks, I am cheerfully heading off outside to find ice. Ice patterns shaped on ponds, lakes or rivers are one of the most magnetic subjects during the beginning of winter. The window to find ice patterns is short, because all surfaces on the ground are covered once snow falls in Alaska. Wandering around looking for ice reminds me of treasure hunting in my boyhood. I used to run out into woods after school hours. Exploring places that made up my neighborhood was an adventure and I enjoyed leaving my footprints on unknown areas. It was fun and uplifting enough to fulfill my young, innocent curiosity. As an adult, photographing ice has its roots from those childhood adventures. It’s in that spirit I strive to know the environment deeper-and genuine curiosity propels me to be involved in the place I live. It’s a dialog between nature and me. The photograph is the treasure I take from hunting my surroundings. About the “Ice Formation” series: This series captured ice formations on lakes and rivers in Fairbanks, Alaska. Many of these are frozen bubbles of gases like Methane or carbine dioxide trapped under ice. The diameter of the ice formations in these photos is about 10-30 inches. Because methane gas is considered as one of the fundamental causes of greenhouse effects, scientists in Alaska are researching these frozen bubbles in relation to the global climate change.

From $300

~

John Kane, Issaquah, WA

Artist Statement: In Seneca, Oregon, in February, with blowing snow obscuring the horizon, a bear in cleats surveys a snowed- in ball field. Seneca lies at the very northwest corner of the Great Basin. The bear faces southeast, away from the Cascades and toward the desert basins of southeast Oregon and Nevada. I can construct a geographical fantasy in which the fence is the hydrological divide: as the snow to the west beyond the fence melts the water will find its way to the Columbia River and the Pacific, while water from the snow in the outfield will flow eastward to evaporate in the shallow lakes and alkali pans of the Great Basin Desert. This fantasy, though too precise by far, helps me to appreciate the physical geography as well as the human re-shaping of it.

“Landscape” is a human concept; “land” is geology, it pre-exists us. By occupying or re-shaping or even by observing the land we transform it into landscape. I am in search of the stories, the history, the values, and the myths that power that transformation, and thus add human meaning to the geography. There is a point where our values, history and mythology intersect with the geography, and where the act of looking determines what is seen; I try to photograph as close as I can to that point.

Or, if it’s beautiful, cool, ironic, classic, or mysterious, I just can’t resist.

All of these pictures were photographed on medium-format film. I have no grudge against digital, but for medium- format quality it’s still too expensive, and film does what I need to do. However, the excellent film I have used for the last decade has been discontinued, and once the small stock in my fridge is gone, my way of working will necessarily change. I wait with bated breath…

From $600

~

Bob Keefer, Creswell, OR

Artist Statement: Hand coloring black and white photographs mixes the cool modern look of photography with the soulful, ancient practice of painting. That’s one reason I like making them. Another reason is, I just think they look exciting. This portfolio contains 10 hand-colored photos taken this year of one of my favorite subjects, the western Oregon forest.

From $100

~

Ann Kendellen, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: At the end of the school day the buildings lie vacant. Remnants of work – the stuff of learning – cluster against glass panes. Some is artfully arranged and other bits and pieces lay apparently forgotten, gathering dust. The arrangements can be funny, dreamlike, poignant, and mysterious. They remind me of my children and students, but they also take me back to my own days as a child in a schoolhouse. We were all funny, and we were all dreamy.

From $350

~

Until next week,

Amanda B. Clem,
Membership & Gallery Manager

 

 

 

Spotlight: 2013 Pacific NW Photography Viewing Drawers (round 2)

In celebration of Blue Sky’s 38th birthday last weekend (October 5), we began a weekly series spotlighting all of the artists represented in the 2013 Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers!

Blue Sky established the Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers program in 2007 to feature a juried, public archive of original prints by contemporary photographers based in the region. Our Drawers program has quickly become a favorite aspect of Blue Sky’s ongoing programming, available to approximately 25,000 visitors annually. For 2012—to coincide with the newly inaugurated Portland Photo Month (every April)—Blue Sky expanded the geographic scope of the Drawers program to include photographers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia, and Alaska.

We’ll be posting here a preview of 10 Drawers artists published every week through Thanksgiving (aka: the beginning of holiday gift shopping season). Yes, all the prints in the Drawers are for sale! Email Amanda Clem at amandaclem@blueskygallery.org or call (503) 225-0210 to inquire about prices and availability. Better yet, come to the gallery and take some time to look at the prints in person.

Have a look at the first 10 artist profiles HERE.

Without further ado, here are this week’s 10…

Kevin Clark, Florence, OR

Artist Statement: I was born in Portland, Oregon and have spent most of my life photographing and editing for newspapers in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. While much of my career has been spent photographing people at work and playing sports I have spent the last several years capturing images of street scenes in Seattle, Portland and Eugene.

From $175

~

Larry Clark, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: In my youth I pursued photography but focused on my career for the past three decades. In my profession as an antiques dealer I have bought and sold, collected and examined countless vintage photographs that have informed my eye and satisfied my passion for photography. Through the years, however, I have never stopped taking my own photographs.

I clearly remember seeing Nick Ut’s Napalm Girl and Malcolm Browne’s Burning Monk when those photos were published. I wanted to know the story behind a particular image, especially when it was unpleasant or challenging subject matter.

In this series, I was interested in photographing a grisly subject and presenting it in the most beautiful way possible. I hope that the softness, the lack of light, and the atmospheric effect serve to draw the eye in and help others see what I see.

From $225- $275

~

Susan de Witt, Portland, OR

 

“Susan de Witt uses photography, not as many do to record and reproduce what the camera sees, but to produce very personal images from her imagination. Her photographic prints may be built up from more than one view of the same object or by combining different subject matter to produce a final result that is greater than its constituent parts.

 

The surreal overtones in her images play both to the subconscious and to the imagination, telling us not what to see but inviting us to see in them what we find.

 

Her choice of the lith printing process to produce her multiple images presents her both with real technical challenges due to the nature of the process and significant aesthetic advantages as the distinctive visual properties of the lith prints produced in this way further removes her imagery from the realism of conventional photographic reproduction.”

 

—Tim Rudman, Photographer & Author

From $325

~

Hal Gage, Anchorage, AK

 

Artist Statement The images presented here are of the humble frozen water puddle, the final canto from my larger series on ice. These are abstracts that subtly show the soul and the emotional depth I witness in ice. Through this and other bodies within my Ice Series, I have made a visual exploration of ice’s presence, its place in my life, and strive to give it a voice. My work pays tribute to something that is often overlooked: a substance, through its presence (and absence), which affects all life on this planet.

From $600- $2,000

~

Clarke Galusha, Portland, OR

 

Artist Statement: The photographs in this collection were made using the wet-plate collodion process to create tintype portraits. The tintypes are hand made and individually exposed, creating a one of a kind object. The tintype portrait is a reflection of what we see – a mirror image. The materials make the image darker and richer, creating a dense reflection of a moment in time.

 

I was intrigued by the idea of engaging children in this project. I believed that children would be genuine, not yet self-conscious about their appearance in photographs. Because the tintype process captures so well a still, calm moment in time, I found that the intelligence and complexity of a child seemed to reveal themselves in these portraits. I tried not to pose, suggest, or intervene in their presentation. The children were not asked to smile but were just encouraged to relax and look at the camera. What seems to come through in each portrait is the genuine, adorable, and complex character of each individual child: a true reflection of themselves.

From $200

~

Reathel Geary, Eugene, OR

 

Artist Statement: “Waiting for Griffin” — Autism is a separation of experience, where one is unable to participate fully in our shared reality. My son Griffin is autistic. Most of our experience is fraught with difficulty punctuated by moments of intense emotion. Moments shared in these photographs are what I see as a father of a little boy struggling with autism. They are sometimes beautiful, often difficult and always true. Not only to the moment but also to my hopes and fears for the future.

 

Each photograph is printed as a photogravure, a process that requires a high degree of physical manipulation. Each time I wipe the plate to remove the excess ink I do so with a father’s hand. As I work the plate my son is revealed to me anew, beautiful and frightening in all his future possibilities. I see him for who he truly could be and I find myself waiting for Griffin.

From $500

~

Richard Gehrke, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: These images are photographic tableaus that function as entries in a visual diary. Events range from the mundane to the monumental, personal or universal and use a wide range of symbols and metaphor to relay the occurrences depicted.

From $600

~

Nicole Gelinas, Poulsbo, WA

 

Artist Statement: This series, titled Illuminae, came about as I noticed that a bouquet of flowers had long expired. The pieces of what were once roses had dried and almost fused to the glass vase.

 

I chose to photograph these remains to bring life back to something that had died. Through my manipulation of light and composition I have revealed a suggestion of subtle movements or vibrations. My images reveal a new and wondrous side of decay and at the same time illuminate the life and beauty that I see within these discarded flowers.

 

From $345

~

Barbara Gilson, Portland, OR

 

Artist Statement: Herman’s story begins for me with Herman’s honey, “From The Bee To Thee”. He is an extraordinary farmer. His strong hands are sculpted from years of picking apples, Gravensteins, tart and juicy; his fingers curled, shaped like his prized pears, yellow Bartletts, soft and buttery. Interlaken Grapes laden on the vines: crisp, bountiful, and vigorous, reference Herman’s native homeland, Switzerland. Herman tells me that the immigrants came to market for his prune plums, bushel loads of them that rekindled their precious memories: the smell, taste, and flavor of their homelands.

 

Herman emigrated from Switzerland in the early 1950’s making his home high on a hill in Gaston, Oregon. The land is striped with orchards of apples, pears, plums, rows of grapes, fields of potatoes and collards, and acres of woods filled with trees that Herman planted himself. Now close to 80, Herman no longer farms his land to come to market, but his connection to the land that has been his livelihood is ever present. Goats are a recent addition to the farm, a gift from his children, some of whom understand that Herman still needs to tend to and care for life on the farm. His loyal canine, “Dog”, close by his side, somehow manages to steer clear of Herman’s high tailing down the farm road in his 4 x 4 cart, searching for downed trees to cut for firewood to heat his bungalow. A pride born of living close to the land, Herman grows his own food, he juices his grapes, he sauces his apples, and he packs goat meat into his cavernous freezer. “I won’t starve, I can feed myself well and even my goats eat better than many in town.” Having lived deeply on this rich parcel of earth, Herman Obrist needs to remain there till his final days, for his spirit is inseparably tied to that very place.

From $350

~

Joseph Glasgow, Vancouver, WA

Artist Statement: “Maryhill, 2012″ — These photos were taken in Maryhill, Washington, population 98, on the banks of the Columbia River. Sam Hill named this place after his daughter, Mary. What he envisioned as a settlement are now just remains, and his mansion a museum. No one ever came to join his community of Quakers. The wind never stops. Whatever he saw in this place I must see too, because I return here again and again. I observe the small changes in the desolate cemetery, and big changes like the wind turbines on the hill.

Peaches grow well in the narrow fertile strip down by the river, but it’s not a lush easy life. The fruit dump is the result of cheap produce from around the globe. Priced out, the growers here have no choice but to waste their crop. And so, windows break, flags shred, machinery continues to grind, and life, work, and death goes on.

 

From $200

~

Tune in again next Saturday for round three!

Until then,

Amanda B. Clem,
Membership & Gallery Manager

 

Happy Birthday, Blue Sky!

Today we celebrate Blue Sky’s 38th birthday! Seems fitting that today we begin a weekly series spotlighting all of the artists represented in the 2013 Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers!

Blue Sky established the Pacific Northwest Photography Viewing Drawers program in 2007 to feature a juried, public archive of original prints by contemporary photographers based in the region. Our Drawers program has quickly become a favorite aspect of Blue Sky’s ongoing programming, available to approximately 25,000 visitors annually. For 2012—to coincide with the newly inaugurated Portland Photo Month (every April)—Blue Sky expanded the geographic scope of the Drawers program to include photographers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia, and Alaska.

Beginning today, we’ll be posting here a preview of 10 Drawers artists published every week through Thanksgiving (aka: the beginning of holiday gift shopping season). Yes, all the prints in the Drawers are for sale! Email Amanda Clem at amandaclem@blueskygallery.org or call (503) 225-0210 to inquire about prices and availability. Better yet, come to the gallery and take some time to look at the prints in person.

Let’s get started: here are this week’s 10…

Bobby Abrahamson, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: These images are part of a larger, collaborative project shot in 2011 titled “The 45th Parallel.” The project profiled three endangered rural towns in Oregon, focusing on economic depression and rising energy deficits that render rural life increasingly more difficult to sustain. The series included interviews with local residents, essays by author Lisa Wells, and photographs by photographer Bobby Abrahamson. This work was exhibited at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Oregon in 2011.

From $350—$500

~

Jody Ake, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: I have always loved the west. The mountains and desert plains call to me with a promise of adventure and solitude. I travel there as often as I can, amazed at the scope of the land, looking for meaning in the emptiness. I think of early photographers heading west for the first time, carrying with them their large cameras and working with laborious early processes. Capturing images of the west that most will not see for themselves. I think of them as I look for signs of those that came before me. Photographing the evidence left behind by progress and expansion. I photograph the New West through an old process, comparing what I find with what those that came before me found.

From: $1,100—$2,200

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Troi Anderson, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: Espiritismo, the practice of communication with ancestral spirits through trance possession is found throughout the Caribbean and Latin America. In Venezuela, a mythological goddess figure of centuries-old indigenous legendMaria Lionzais the focal point for gatherings in the mist-laden jungle of Mount Sorte. This magico-religious movement is composed in perfect reflection of Venezuela’s own multicultural history. It is a syncretic, mestizo blending of African, Spanish and Indian traditions and beliefs. Theatrical healing ceremonies and colorful pageantry blend wildly to bring forth knowledge of the esoteric passed down through spiritual caravans, pilgrims known as the Marialionceras.

For the past several years I have embarked on a process to discover and document the religious desire and its elemental expressions throughout the world. In my own upbringing technology has dominated my understanding creating a psychological underpinning that everything has in some way been answered, classified, made subordinate to some expertise, equation or data.

I want my work to expose the viewer to a world that defies this confinement—one whose foundation rests in the unknown. Spirit, ritual and ceremony exist first from what in Haitian Vodou is called the Myste’re. Its human expression begins with great beauty, warmth, power and embrace. These are elements rooted in our ancestry and their flickering shadows still define us in the mystery of life.

From: $400

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Adam Bacher, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: “Waiting for Care” — A U.S. based medical team of doctors and healthcare professionals travel to Haiti one week each year to treat the medically disenfranchised in rural areas of northern Haiti. Each day the team leaves its base before sunrise, drives to their location, sets up a mobile medical clinic, and treats hundreds of people. The day ends at sunset, due to lack of electricity. The clinic is packed up and the team returns home. The results are astonishing. After five hard days of work, nearly 1500 people are seen by doctors, given a thorough medical examination, and supplied with needed medications.

Equally astonishing are the numbers of people who show up for a chance to be seen at the clinics, and how long they’re willing to wait. On any given day, twice as many people will come, as the team is able to treat.

For the last two years I’ve accompanied the HACAOT medical team (Haitian Caribbean American Organization of Texas). On Wednesday November 11th, 2011, the team left their base in Cap Haitian at 6:10 am, and drove to the town of Dondon. When they arrived at 8:15 am, there were already 500 people waiting. By 10 am the crowd had swelled to 1100. The last patient finished at the clinic at 5:27 pm, under flashlight illumination. A total of four-hundred and ten people were treated.

The crowd at Dondon was the largest I’ve seen. Only a third of the people were able to get into the clinic. This collection of photographs, taken at the Dondon clinic on November 11, 2011, are images of people waiting outside the treatment area hoping to be one of the lucky ones to be admitted. Three of the photographs are of people who were eventually seen, five of the photos are of people who were not.

From $325

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Raymond Bidegain, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: “Finding Beauty” — Confessions of a photo romantic: I believe in the soothing nature of beautiful things I like making things with my hands and the inherent beauty of hand crafted platinum prints I am a purist I believe that artists have an important role in society For me, the act of photographing and the process of making prints is a deliberate, contemplative experience The process is as much a part of the resulting image as the subject itself I believe that beauty is in everything and every person I endeavor to reveal the beauty in ordinary things My work is important to me – it is an important part of me I get comfort out of knowing that other people view my work and make it part of their lives

From: $225$300

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Scott Binkley, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: Seven of the ten photographs presented here were included in a photo-essay that accompanied Cheston Knapp’s written essay, “Faces of Pain,” published together in the Fall 2012 Portland to Brooklyn issue of Tin House Magazine. The photographer and writer spent several months immersed in the historically rich and ongoing world of professional wrestling in Portland, Oregon. With the use of canted angles, B&W film, and at times a flash, stylistically the photographs reference a bygone era in photojournalism, as the content unveils the dynamic relationship between performance and audience.

From: $150

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Nancy Butler, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: “Close to Home” — I have been photographing urban landscapes in Portland, Oregon since 1982. I joined the Portland Grid Project in 2007. In this new series, “Close to Home,” I have been working outside the Grid Project, exploring neighborhoods close to the homes where I have lived in the past 25 years. I have found lately that residential areas hold the greatest interest for me with a stronger presence of trees and plants in the images. My earlier work was built much more around houses and buildings.

Light and color direct my wandering but very often it is the small details in a particular scene that stop me. I like to find a quiet calm place in my images. There are many times in Portland when the sky is gray and the beauty of the light comes from an overcast sky, porch lights, and reflections off the wet streets. I find these images comforting, they make me smile and appreciate this place where I have made my home.

From: $400

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Michael Cardiello, Helena, MT

Artist Statement: Michael Cardiello is a visual artist who splits his time between Burns Lake, British Columbia; Helena, Montana; Portland, Oregon; and Montreal, Québec. He received a BFA in Photography from Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2010. Michael’s work focuses on his alternative, and often strange, life. This summer he will continue an on-going photo series titled “Stand Still,” which is related to labor camps, transient youth, and nomadic seasonal workers (tree planters) in northern British Columbia. All of his photos are captured on a specific discontinued color film stock with specialized 90’s era cameras. He co-founded Incandescent, a color film zine based in Portland, OR. He’s currently teaching photography, filmmaking, and stop-animation classes to grade school students.

Please inquire for pricing.

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Brad Carlile, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: “Tempus Incognitus” (Time Unknown) is my series of photographs depicting hotel rooms in which time and space fade into one another. Think Edward Hopper interiors awash in James Turrell colors with David Lynch directing.

“Tempus Incognitus” challenges our intuition about time by showing the day’s intervals of changing light existing concurrently. The Cubists painted individual scenes from several different perspectives all at once. I photographed individual rooms at several different times of day from a single perspective.

I utilize a time-intensive technique that captures the evolution of light and emphasizes change in vivid colors. I shoot multiple exposures over the course of two days or more in order to produce each image, which is created in-camera and on-film with no digital manipulation.

From: $2,200

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Adrain Chesser, Vancouver, WA

Artist Statement: “Grand Manner” — These portraits of my friends and chosen family express some of the mythic and archetypal qualities they embody. For me these attributes are largely informed by their chosen position of living on the fringes or outside of the society they were born into.

From: $1,200

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Teresa Christiansen, Portland, OR

Artist Statement: These images are part of a series called “Real Artifice,” in which I make photographs in the studio of constructed still life sets through which I play with the notion of re-presentation and the fusion of object and depiction within the picture. Within every composition, there is one element that is presented as a photographic print. Thus, the act of taking a photo often happens several times before I make the final photograph. In some images the reproduced object appears more genuine than the real, and the distinction of what is “real” begins to lose significance. The series explores the nature of the medium of photography by drawing attention to its transparent nature in which the tactile surface is often forgotten, and its tendency to be viewed through many layers of mediation and re- contextualization.

From: $500

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Be sure to visit this blog again next week to “meet” 10 more artists!

Until then,

Amanda B. Clem,
Membership & Gallery Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Blue Sky’s Newest Board Member

Please join us in welcoming Blue Sky’s newest board member, Keren Ceballos!

Blue Sky and Keren officially became acquainted earlier this year at Arts Connector, an event presented by Portland’s Business for Culture and the Arts (BCA) at the Nines Hotel. BCA created this special event to introduce young professionals, particularly those of color, to nonprofit arts organizations in the region looking for new board and committee members….kind of like organizational speed-dating, if you will.

Keren approached Blue Sky’s table, staffed by Blue Sky’s Executive Director Todd J. Tubutis and Board member Ann Kendellen, and it turned out her skills, experience, and interests were a great match for what Blue Sky had been seeking to grow its board membership.

Keren is originally from Guatemala and has lived in Oregon for more than 20 years. She is fluent in Spanish and holds a Bachelors of Science degree in Business Administration from Portland State University. In addition to her ten plus years of banking experience, Keren worked for Intel Corporation before taking on her current position as a financial analyst for the City of Gresham.

In addition to her expertise with fiscal management and human resources, she comes to Blue Sky with a keen interest in photography, a passion which took root in 2007. Having bought an SLR camera, she figured she needed to learn how to use it and took photography classes at Mount Hood Community College. As she puts it, “the biggest impact was understanding the many stories that can be told through photography without saying a word.” Keren enjoys photographing other cultures, people, landscapes, and events. And, as you might expect from a photographer with such interests, she also enjoys traveling and reading; “constant learning is a must.”

We’re glad we met, Keren. Welcome to Blue Sky!